Adults chat seniors

En español | Phil D'Eramo used to call his parents four or five times a day to make sure they took their medication.

An only child from upstate New York, D'Eramo was worried, especially about his 89-year-old father, who has Alzheimer's disease. When his father went out for short drives, was he getting home safely?

"Technology is allowing me to stay on my own as long as I can — I would like to die right here in my condo," said Phyllis Bek-gran of Venice, Fla., who turns 90 this month.

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It has six sensors that D'Eramo has placed on his parents' pillboxes, the refrigerator, the microwave, the bathroom door and his father's key chain."We didn't want to take his independence away but had to protect him," says Reeves, who moved with her husband from Portland, Ore., to Green Forest, Ark., to be near his parents.Skipping doses or taking too many pills, at the wrong time or not at all, has serious consequences.Many older people need multiple medications multiple times a day; a memory issue compounds the task.What it is: A digital pill dispenser that looks like a regular seven-day model.

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